Maysville Kentucky Blog

The Maysville Kentucky Blog is your guide to the beautiful and historic small town of Maysville Kentucky, snuggled into the rolling hills along the Ohio River. Though this blog has been discontinued, you can get your Maysville Kentucky fix over at Ken Downing's Mason County Kentucky Blog @ http://masoncountyky.blogspot.com

Comments: Craft Kills: Radical Lace & Subversive Knitting

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Craft Kills: Radical Lace & Subversive Knitting


Althea Merback, Gloves, 2005, Wire-knitted silk, Collection Kentucky Gateway Museum Center
Another great lead from the Ledger Independent: The Kathleen Savage Browning Miniatures Collection will be a key feature at the Kentucky Gateway Museum Center when construction is complete and it opens later this year, but pieces from that collection are currently on display at The Museum of Art and Design in New York City. Four pieces in total by micro-knit artist Althea Merback are loaned from the collection, including a pair of ancient-Greek-inspired gloves (pictured left-above).

The exhibit is called Radical Lace & Subversive Knitting. A spokesperson for the museum said the exhibit "explores the phenomenal rise to prominence of knitting, crocheting and lace making in the world of contemporary artists from around the world." Yeah, maybe, but it's much cooler than that.

According to the museum's website, the exhibit, which features 27 artists from seven countries, explores "[r]adical reformers in the world of knitting and lace making [that] have overthrown the status quo from the inside out. In the space of ten years, knitting has emerged from the 'loving hands at home' hobbyist's den into museums and galleries worldwide."

Some pieces even provide social commentary. One piece, for example, highlights the countries that have publically detonated nuclear weapons. Another piece uses "computer software that translates video images into 'knitted' images to educate about sweatshop labor." Freddie Robins's Craft Kills piece (pictured right-above) is described as "a self-portrait that plays with our notions of craft as a passive activity."

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